EU, Ukraine, NATO and a role for the UK in the Eastern neighborhood

By Marco Rossi | 30 March 2011

In the aftermath of the Orange Revolution of 2004 and following the Ukraine-Russia energy crises of 2005-09, the country’s ‘Western shift’ towards the EU appeared to be a mere question of time. Five years later, these expectations turned out to be too optimistic. How to explain the ‘enlargement fatigue’ on both sides of the frontier between Ukraine and the EU? And what influence can the UK have on the process?

No garbage in the streets! Misplaced concerns in prevailing world hypocrisies

By Ivan Matic | 28 March 2011

The return of Roma from France to Romania and Bulgaria is not a new phenomenon. Europea Roma Rights Centre (ERRC) reported that France has been returning Roma to these countries under various schemes in significant numbers since at least 2007. What is new with expulsions of Roma that occurred in 2010 and why this issue never came into focus before? But before, passed the common picture and prejudice we have of them, what do we know about the European Romani population?

A call for pragmatism of the Polish foreign policy

By Valentin Stoian | 17 February 2011

The Polish foreign policy has recently had a good press in the mainstream media. A departure from the times of romantic passions, often marked by russophobia, disorganization and pettiness, which have been  associated with the government of the Kaczynski brothers (formed by their party Law and Justice, ‘Prawo i Sprawiedliwość’) is repeatedly mentioned. What has happened? What will be the consequences of such a change? This article aims to assess these changes it the context of the European politics.

Russia – France relations: The fools of the Georgia war

By Tita Aver | 18 January 2011

Many remember the European Union presidency of French leader Sarkozy and its strong management of the Russia-Georgia conflict in August 2008. During one summer, the EU seemed at last to act like a global player. Yet some analysts suggest that the influence of France and the EU on the solution of the crisis was clearly overrated.

Why do Belarusians go to Western countries to study?

By Tatsiana Hurynovich | 6 January 2011

According to statistics, Belarusians tend to leave their country to study in Western countries. They also seem to prefer European universities. Belarusian authorities are doing everything to encourage students to study "at home". But how is this care expressed?

Serbia’s Bid For EU Membership: A Progress Report

By Mathilde Bonneau | 4 January 2011

Serbia is getting closer and closer to an official candidacy for EU membership. It is now waiting for the Commission to give the green light in 2011. In the meantime, one may read the Progress Report which reviews the situation. True, Serbia has made strong steps so far, but at least two strides are needed: the arrest of war criminals Ratko Mladić and Goran Hadžić, and above all, a more constructive attitude towards Kosovo.

Have Poles left the UK in the aftermath of the financial crisis?

By Marion Soury | 23 November 2010

After the 2004 Eastern enlargement, Poles immigrated massively to the UK and account today for the largest part of the country’s migrant population from Central and Eastern Europe. In the wake of the financial crisis followed by the economic downturn that harshly struck the UK, studies claim that Polish nationals have, for the most part, gone back to their home country. But is this assumption backed by evidence? And what are the perspectives regarding Polish immigration to the UK?

The New Europe or British intellectuals’ commitment to the small nations’ cause

By Claudia Louati | 16 November 2010

Nouvelle Europe has a British namesake, The New Europe. During the First World War, a British interest in the fate of Eastern and south-Eastern countries emerged and expressed itself through this publication. With the recent creation of Nouvelle Europe – United Kingdom, our new editorial office based in London, the history and development of this British review, which focused on the “new” Europe, become all the more interesting.

Veiko Spolitis: Baltic views on Turkish accession

By Philippe Perchoc | 14 November 2010

Veiko Spolitis is both Estonian and Latvian. He's an academic working in Rīgas Stradiņa universitātes (Latvia) and in Helsinki University (Finland). He is the ideal person to explain to us the debate about the European Union's enlargement to Turkey from the shores of the Baltic Sea.