CEE

Democratization and the paradoxes of history - Interview with Professor Grzegorz Ekiert – Harvard University

By Zbigniew Truchlewski | 17 June 2013

To what extent do history and space shape the process of democratization? How to analyze the so-called transition paradigm? Grzegorz Ekiert, Professor of Government, Director of the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies and Senior Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, answers Zbigniew Truchlewski's questions for Nouvelle Europe.

Sexual rights between “Polandisation” and Europeanisation

By Annamária Tóth | 18 October 2012

 There is a Hungarian saying that the Hungarians and the Poles are good friends and will stay together for better or for worse. This saying seems to be reconfirmed in some of today's socio-political debates. As far as abortion and other sexual, reproductive and health rights (SRHR) are concerned, “Hungary is polandising,” Judith Wirth, Policy Officer at NaNe Women's Association from Budapest, argued at the conference “Women, Gender and Feminism(s) in the V4 Countries”.

Women in Central European Economies: Challenges and Perspectives

By Aurore Guieu (V4SciencesPo) | 15 October 2012

Women in Central Europe experienced the bloom of democracy and liberalized economies since they got rid of communist regimes. These transitions gave birth to many expectations, as did the 2004 EU accession. But what is the actual position of women in economies and particularly in labour markets? What are their challenges and future perspectives?

Belarus economic partnerships: decisive elements of the longevity of the regime

By Belarus Project | 21 February 2012

The recent economic crisis affecting Belarus is seen as one of the harshest the country has ever been through. The government is covered in debts and has difficulties in paying for its imports, as its currency is constantly devalued. Consequently, it is forced to negotiate several economic and financial aid deals. Moreover, degrading relations with the West and unstable relations with Russia show the fragility of the country. Such a situation raises the question of the stability and longevity of the government. How to stay in power in such unfavourable conditions? Lukashenko has found parts of the answer: to reinforce relations with countries like China, Iran or Venezuela that have a similar vision of the world and international relations. 

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