CEE

Constructions from the South Caucasus: Pipelines and Khachkars

By Andreas Pacher | 3 October 2016

In the Visegrád countries, traditional Armenian cross-stones (or khachkars) are silently countering Azerbaijan’s major role as a future gas provider to the EU. The diaspora-funded activities often obtain local governments' support for their seemingly unharmful nature. However, the khachkars have the potential to subtly and enduringly change the public’s perceptions in the V4, whose governments are seen as crucial drivers behind the EU’s Eastern Partnership.

The Visegrad Group’s development assistance to Eastern Partnership countries

By Balázs Gyimesi | 2 October 2016

The Visegrad countries’ total ODA flows have increased impressively between 2007 and 2014, the main recipients of which are those Eastern Partnership states which directly border the EU, especially Ukraine. The Visegrad Group’s joint aid programme focusing on the EaP countries - the “Visegrad 4 Eastern Partnership” - funds specific projects related to the development of civil society in the EaP states. A strengthening of the common Visegrad framework for the coordination of development assistance efforts would be possible in order to channel development assistance in a more efficient and integrated manner.

Between East and West: The Hungarian Minority in Ukraine

By Inga Chelyadina | 2 October 2016

Though the Hungarian minority in the West of Ukraine is not the largest one in the country, it could still play a crucial role during the current crisis in Ukraine. The minority’s quests could become an asset for Russia. The far-right Jobbik (the third largest party in Hungary financed by Russia) has already shown its will to get Ukrainian Transcarpathia back. This ambition is highly unrealistic; nevertheless, it could, in theory, lead to more separatist discourses, which would weaken the country even more.

Brexit deal: How does the migration from Visegrad countries affect British economy

By Paweł Wiejski | 4 May 2016

The Visegrad Group countries displayed an unprecedented degree of cooperation during the Brexit negotiations.  But not only the interests of the V4 countries are affected by this. Studies confirm that the inflow of Central and Eastern European workers benefits the British welfare state. The section on social benefits and free movement of the Brexit deal is therefore not only undermining the integrity of the European Union, but also directly damaging the British economy.

Trade relations between the United Kingdom and the Visegrad Group

By Balázs Gyimesi | 4 May 2016

Trade relations are a fundamental dimension of international economic ties, furthermore they have been widely regarded as a cornerstone of peaceful and prosperous interstate relations by thinkers like Mill or Schumpeter. The following article scrutinises the development of trade relations between Great Britain and the Visegrad Group in the light of the recent “Brexit” debate.

German-Hungarian Friendship Standing on Shaky Ground

By Daniela Neubacher | 2 November 2015

It has now been 26 years that Hungary opened its borders to refugees from the German Democratic Republic (GDR), thus making a first step towards German reunification. Ironically, fences at Hungary's borders are now putting relations to her most important economic partner to a severe test. Commentary by Daniela Neubacher.

What Can the Baltic States Learn from the Economic Crisis and Recovery?

By Vytautas Kuokštisis, postdoctoral fellow at Vilnius University | 1 June 2015

The Baltic countries were one of the worst hit countries during the Great Recession. Despite numerous predictions about the likely failure of their anti-crisis policy – internal devaluation – the Baltic States have managed to preserve currency pegs, restore fiscal sustainability and return to economic growth. Nevertheless, this fast adjustment should not be taken for granted in the future. The crisis experience speaks to the importance of fiscal policy, trust in government, and safeguarding against excessive indebtedness.

European Identity in a Transforming Political Space: Eastern Enlargement and its Challenges

By Mila Moshelova | 15 February 2014

This article aims to glance beyond the legal and administrative dimensions of EU enlargement and integration and examine conceptions and expressions of identity, suggesting the possibility that, although it is always difficult to judge success and failure in foreign policy making, the notion of identity, if approached with caution, can provide with useful hints for understanding challenges in external and internal EU politics. In this light, a few years down the line, what challenges has enlargement posed to the EU in terms of identity?

Latvia in the euro zone: national economic outlook for 2014

By Petar Traykov | 15 February 2014

Recent forecasts about the state of the Latvian economy in 2014 are largely optimistic and predict that the Baltic country will maintain its position among the top-performing EU nations this year in terms of economic growth. Many commentators have highlighted the importance of Latvia’s recent accession to the euro zone for its continued post-crisis recovery in 2014. However, apart from facilitating progress towards the Baltic nations’ medium- and long-term economic goals, the euro zone also poses a number of important challenges to national and European policy-makers.

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